Psalm 139.1-24 – November 6, 2020

Psalm 139.1-24

You have searched me, Lord,
and you know me.
You know when I sit and when I rise;
you perceive my thoughts from afar.
You discern my going out and my lying down;
you are familiar with all my ways.
Before a word is on my tongue
you, Lord, know it completely.
You hem me in behind and before,
and you lay your hand upon me.
Such knowledge is too wonderful for me,
too lofty for me to attain.

23 Search me, God, and know my heart;
test me and know my anxious thoughts.
24 See if there is any offensive way in me,
and lead me in the way everlasting.

 (Psalm 139:1–6, 23-24, NIV)

Is there another passage in scripture that better communicate the intimacy of God’s knowledge of you? Feeling left out and all alone? This is the psalm for you!

Thought Questions:

Do you think of God searching you as a positive or negative thing? Why do you feel this is the case?

In what ways do you see people seeking to be fully known? In what ways do they look to their relationship with God to provide this, versus a relationship with other people or things?

Pray that God will search you today and as he does, respond to his prompting.

Colossians 1.24-29 – November 5, 2020

Colossians 1.24–29

Now I rejoice in what I am suffering for you, and I fill up in my flesh what is still lacking in regard to Christ’s afflictions, for the sake of his body, which is the church. 25 I have become its servant by the commission God gave me to present to you the word of God in its fullness—26 the mystery that has been kept hidden for ages and generations, but is now disclosed to the Lord’s people. 27 To them God has chosen to make known among the Gentiles the glorious riches of this mystery, which is Christ in you, the hope of glory. 

28 He is the one we proclaim, admonishing and teaching everyone with all wisdom, so that we may present everyone fully mature in Christ. 29 To this end I strenuously contend with all the energy Christ so powerfully works in me.  (Colossians 1.24–29, NIV)

Who gives you the power to do what you do?

Thought Questions:

How often do you think of gratitude or rejoicing when you are suffering? Why do you think Paul can react in this way?

What–or who–gives you hope?

Do you find sharing your faith with others an easy task or one that causes you to be fatigued? How can working through Christ’s power help you share your faith with others?

Matthew 5.3-12 – November 2, 2020

Matthew 5.3–12

“Blessed are the poor in spirit,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.
Blessed are those who mourn,
for they will be comforted.
Blessed are the meek,
for they will inherit the earth.
Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness,
for they will be filled.
Blessed are the merciful,
for they will be shown mercy.
Blessed are the pure in heart,
for they will see God.
Blessed are the peacemakers,
for they will be called children of God.
10 Blessed are those who are persecuted because of righteousness,
for theirs is the kingdom of heaven. 

11 “Blessed are you when people insult you, persecute you and falsely say all kinds of evil against you because of me. 12 Rejoice and be glad, because great is your reward in heaven, for in the same way they persecuted the prophets who were before you.  (Matthew 5.3–12, NIV)

“I like it because I strive to be a peacemaker and pure in heart.”

Thought Questions:

What do you think the people listening to Jesus were thinking when they heard him describe those who were part of the kingdom of heaven? In what ways did these groups NOT fit people’s expectations?

Which of these beatitudes connects the most with you? Why is this the case?

Why is it hard for us to seek a reward in heaven versus rewards here on this earth?

Genesis 15.1-21 – November 1, 2020

Genesis 15.1–21

After this, the word of the Lord came to Abram in a vision: 

“Do not be afraid, Abram.
I am your shield, 
your very great reward. ” 

But Abram said, “Sovereign Lord, what can you give me since I remain childless and the one who will inherit my estate is Eliezer of Damascus?” And Abram said, “You have given me no children; so a servant in my household will be my heir.”
Then the word of the Lord came to him: “This man will not be your heir, but a son who is your own flesh and blood will be your heir.” He took him outside and said, “Look up at the sky and count the stars—if indeed you can count them.” Then he said to him, “So shall your offspring be.”
Abram believed the Lord, and he credited it to him as righteousness.
He also said to him, “I am the Lord, who brought you out of Ur of the Chaldeans to give you this land to take possession of it.”
But Abram said, “Sovereign Lord, how can I know that I will gain possession of it?”
So the Lord said to him, “Bring me a heifer, a goat and a ram, each three years old, along with a dove and a young pigeon.”
10 Abram brought all these to him, cut them in two and arranged the halves opposite each other; the birds, however, he did not cut in half. 11 Then birds of prey came down on the carcasses, but Abram drove them away.
12 As the sun was setting, Abram fell into a deep sleep, and a thick and dreadful darkness came over him. 13 Then the Lord said to him, “Know for certain that for four hundred years your descendants will be strangers in a country not their own and that they will be enslaved and mistreated there. 14 But I will punish the nation they serve as slaves, and afterward they will come out with great possessions. 15 You, however, will go to your ancestors in peace and be buried at a good old age. 16 In the fourth generation your descendants will come back here, for the sin of the Amorites has not yet reached its full measure.”
17 When the sun had set and darkness had fallen, a smoking firepot with a blazing torch appeared and passed between the pieces. 18 On that day the Lord made a covenant with Abram and said, “To your descendants I give this land, from the Wadi of Egypt to the great river, the Euphrates—19 the land of the Kenites, Kenizzites, Kadmonites, 20 Hittites, Perizzites, Rephaites, 21 Amorites, Canaanites, Girgashites and Jebusites.” 
 (Genesis 15.1–21, NIV)

God makes a promise to Abraham that he can and will keep, in spite of the obstacles that seem to be present.

Thought Questions:

In what ways do you think Abraham’s question to God in verse 2 is a valid one? When have you wrestled with the promises of God that seem contradictory to the actual situation at hand?

How do you think Abraham could believe God in spite of the circumstances? Why is this belief considered righteousness?

What can you do to more able to believe the promises of God that seem impossible?

Luke 14.25-35 – October 30, 2020

Luke 14.25–35

Large crowds were traveling with Jesus, and turning to them he said: 26 “If anyone comes to me and does not hate father and mother, wife and children, brothers and sisters—yes, even their own life—such a person cannot be my disciple. 27 And whoever does not carry their cross and follow me cannot be my disciple.
28 “Suppose one of you wants to build a tower. Won’t you first sit down and estimate the cost to see if you have enough money to complete it? 29 For if you lay the foundation and are not able to finish it, everyone who sees it will ridicule you, 30 saying, ‘This person began to build and wasn’t able to finish.’
31 “Or suppose a king is about to go to war against another king. Won’t he first sit down and consider whether he is able with ten thousand men to oppose the one coming against him with twenty thousand? 32 If he is not able, he will send a delegation while the other is still a long way off and will ask for terms of peace. 33 In the same way, those of you who do not give up everything you have cannot be my disciples.
34 “Salt is good, but if it loses its saltiness, how can it be made salty again? 35 It is fit neither for the soil nor for the manure pile; it is thrown out.
“Whoever has ears to hear, let them hear.”
 (Luke 14.25–35, NIV)

The cost of discipleship is large … it is your entire life.

Thought Questions:

Why do we react against the idea that we should “hate our own life?” Does Jesus really want us to hate ourselves? If not, what is he meaning here?

How would the people hearing Jesus’ message reacted to the idea of “picking up a cross?”

How are you being salt in the world in which you live?

Ruth 1.1-22 – October 29, 2020

Ruth 1:1–22

In the days when the judges ruled,  there was a famine in the land. So a man from Bethlehem in Judah, together with his wife and two sons, went to live for a while in the country of Moab. The man’s name was Elimelek, his wife’s name was Naomi, and the names of his two sons were Mahlon and Kilion. They were Ephrathites from Bethlehem, Judah. And they went to Moab and lived there.
Now Elimelek, Naomi’s husband, died, and she was left with her two sons. They married Moabite women, one named Orpah and the other Ruth. After they had lived there about ten years, both Mahlon and Kilion also died, and Naomi was left without her two sons and her husband. 

When Naomi heard in Moab that the Lord had come to the aid of his people by providing food for them, she and her daughters-in-law prepared to return home from there. With her two daughters-in-law she left the place where she had been living and set out on the road that would take them back to the land of Judah.
Then Naomi said to her two daughters-in-law, “Go back, each of you, to your mother’s home. May the Lord show you kindness, as you have shown kindness to your dead husbands and to me. May the Lord grant that each of you will find rest in the home of another husband.”
Then she kissed them goodbye and they wept aloud 10 and said to her, “We will go back with you to your people.”
11 But Naomi said, “Return home, my daughters. Why would you come with me? Am I going to have any more sons, who could become your husbands? 12 Return home, my daughters; I am too old to have another husband. Even if I thought there was still hope for me—even if I had a husband tonight and then gave birth to sons—13 would you wait until they grew up? Would you remain unmarried for them? No, my daughters. It is more bitter for me than for you, because the Lord’s hand has turned against me!”
14 At this they wept aloud again. Then Orpah kissed her mother-in-law goodbye, but Ruth clung to her.
15 “Look,” said Naomi, “your sister-in-law is going back to her people and her gods. Go back with her.”
16 But Ruth replied, “Don’t urge me to leave you or to turn back from you. Where you go I will go, and where you stay I will stay. Your people will be my people and your God my God. 17 Where you die I will die, and there I will be buried. May the Lord deal with me, be it ever so severely, if even death separates you and me.” 18 When Naomi realized that Ruth was determined to go with her, she stopped urging her.
19 So the two women went on until they came to Bethlehem. When they arrived in Bethlehem, the whole town was stirred because of them, and the women exclaimed, “Can this be Naomi?”
20 “Don’t call me Naomi,” she told them. “Call me Mara, because the Almighty  has made my life very bitter. 21 I went away full, but the Lord has brought me back empty. Why call me Naomi? The Lord has afflicted me; the Almighty has brought misfortune upon me.”
22 So Naomi returned from Moab accompanied by Ruth the Moabite, her daughter-in-law, arriving in Bethlehem as the barley harvest was beginning.
 (Ruth 1:1–22, NIV)

Call me bitter! Is there a sadder story than a woman in a foreign country without any family to come to her aid? Or is Naomi without the help she thinks she is?

Thought Questions:

Naomi laments her situation, which indeed would have been challenging. Had you been in her shoes, how do you think you would have reacted to her circumstances?

The book of Ruth is filled with heroes who provide help for those in need. Who is the hero of today’s text? What actions proved heroic?

When your life goes wrong, do you assume you are without help? To whom do you turn for support?

Hosea 1.1-3.5 – October 22, 2020

Hosea 1.1–3.5

1 The word of the Lord that came to Hosea son of Beeri during the reigns of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz and Hezekiah, kings of Judah, and during the reign of Jeroboam son of Jehoash king of Israel: 

When the Lord began to speak through Hosea, the Lord said to him, “Go, marry a promiscuous woman and have children with her, for like an adulterous wife this land is guilty of unfaithfulness to the Lord.” So he married Gomer daughter of Diblaim, and she conceived and bore him a son. 

3 The Lord said to me, “Go, show your love to your wife again, though she is loved by another man and is an adulteress. Love her as the Lord loves the Israelites, though they turn to other gods and love the sacred raisin cakes.” 

So I bought her for fifteen shekels of silver and about a homer and a lethek of barley. Then I told her, “You are to live with me many days; you must not be a prostitute or be intimate with any man, and I will behave the same way toward you.” 

For the Israelites will live many days without king or prince, without sacrifice or sacred stones, without ephod or household gods. Afterward the Israelites will return and seek the Lord their God and David their king. They will come trembling to the Lord and to his blessings in the last days.  (Hosea 1.1–3.5, NIV)

“Hosea & Gomer: The story of God’s love for Israel–as an exmple through Hosea and Gomer. God loves us even when we betray him.”

Thought Questions:

How do you think you would react if God told you to marry someone who was promiscuous and unfaithful?

How willing or unwilling would you have been to take back someone who was unfaithful to you?

How has your view of God and your understanding of his love changed having read the story of Hosea?

Galatians 5.22-26 – October 21, 2020

Galatians 5.22–26

But the fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, forbearance, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, 23 gentleness and self-control. Against such things there is no law. 24 Those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires. 25 Since we live by the Spirit, let us keep in step with the Spirit. 26 Let us not become conceited, provoking and envying each other.  (Galatians 5.22–26, NIV)

Do you live by the Spirit? Is your life full of love, joy, peace…

Thought Questions:

How have you seen the fruit of the Spirit visible in your life?

In what ways have you been able to put aside the flesh, to avoid those things that are not consistent with the fruit of the Spirit?

Why is your relationship with others such a big part of a Spirit filled life?

Mark 2.1-12 – October 20, 2020

Mark 2.1–12

A few days later, when Jesus again entered Capernaum, the people heard that he had come home. They gathered in such large numbers that there was no room left, not even outside the door, and he preached the word to them. Some men came, bringing to him a paralyzed man, carried by four of them. Since they could not get him to Jesus because of the crowd, they made an opening in the roof above Jesus by digging through it and then lowered the mat the man was lying on. When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralyzed man, “Son, your sins are forgiven.”
Now some teachers of the law were sitting there, thinking to themselves, “Why does this fellow talk like that? He’s blaspheming! Who can forgive sins but God alone?”
Immediately Jesus knew in his spirit that this was what they were thinking in their hearts, and he said to them, “Why are you thinking these things? Which is easier: to say to this paralyzed man, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Get up, take your mat and walk’? 10 But I want you to know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins.” So he said to the man, 11 “I tell you, get up, take your mat and go home.” 12 He got up, took his mat and walked out in full view of them all. This amazed everyone and they praised God, saying, “We have never seen anything like this!”  
(Mark 2:1–12, NIV)

What kind of friends do you have? The kind that have enough faith to do whatever they need to to get you to Jesus?

Thought Questions:

What do you think the friends of the paralyzed man thought about him? He obviously could not do everything they could, but do you think they thought less of him because of it?

Why would the religious elite think so poorly of Jesus’ actions which healed a man? Wouldn’t you think they would rejoice that healing came to someone who needed it?

How important is the faith of your friends to you? How does that faith impact your own?

Ruth 4.1-22 – October 19, 2020

Ruth 4.1–22

This, then, is the family line of Perez:
Perez was the father of Hezron,
19 Hezron the father of Ram,
Ram the father of Amminadab,
20 Amminadab the father of Nahshon,
Nahshon the father of Salmon,
21 Salmon the father of Boaz,
Boaz the father of Obed,
22 Obed the father of Jesse,
and Jesse the father of David.

(Ruth 4.18–22, NIV)

In a book that seems slightly off topic, we discover that it is through the lineage of Ruth comes Jesus.

Thought Questions:

So which character in the book of Ruth was most faithful? Might one argue that Boaz was just as faithful as anyone?

How might of the story of Jesus been different if Boaz had not been a part of Ruth’s story?

In what ways has God moved in unusual and surprising ways in your life and the end result was unexpected blessings?